Yesterday, the American alternative rock band Mutemath released an official music video for their single “Monument,” and in the video they tell the true story of Charles “LaLa” Evans. The documentary-style music video was directed by Israel Anthem, and it can be viewed via the video above.

Mutemath’s official “Monument” music video begins with Charles “LaLa” Evans talking about his late wife. They were married just shy of 60 years before she passed away. When she passed away LaLa turned their house into a museum about the life they shared together.

In the rest of the video LaLa is seen watching old home movies, dancing around his home, and dancing in his backyard, which is filled with colorful umbrellas. The entire video was shot inside LaLa’s home, and backyard. He resides in Starkville, Mississippi.

The same day that Mutemath released their official “Monument” music video, they also posted a video of LaLa watching it, which can be viewed here. In the reaction video there’s a small screen in the corner that is playing the official music video, so the viewer can watch what LaLa is reacting too.

On Jan. 25 Mutemath will perform “Monument” live on the daytime talk show, “The Ellen DeGeneres Show.” Also appearing on the show that day will be LaLa, who is going to sit down and talk with Ellen.

The song “Monument” is featured on Mutemath’s fourth full-length studio album, Vitals. The album came out last year on Nov. 13, and this year they will be touring around the world in support of it.

[Verse 1]
There’s a daylight going under
There’s a new spark to discover
And you know we’re not getting any younger
So remember, this is our time

[Chorus]
I wanna drive an open road
Can we go out tonight
Anything goes
Let’s make a monument for our love, our love
Our love, our love
Let’s make a monument for our love, our love
Our love, our love

 
[Verse 2]
There’s a memory around the corner
There’s an angel on our shoulders
To remind us life is far from over
So remember, this is our time

[Chorus]
I wanna drive an open road
Can we go out tonight
Anything goes
Let’s make a monument for our love, our love
Our love, our love
Let’s make a monument for our love, our love
Our love, our love

[Bridge]
Every night is ours to own
Everywhere is ours to roam
Every sun is sunshine gold
Everywhere
Let’s make a monument for our love, our love
Another monument for our love, our love

[Outro]
Our love, our love, our love, our love
Let’s make a monument for our love, our love
Make a monument for our love, our love


For a band so steeped in classic songwriting, Bear’s Den were never going to approach their debut album lightly.

And so it proved. The group analysed their career with some caution, releasing a flurry of EPs, little self-contained documents as an introduction to their world.

Heading to the studio earlier this year with long term producer Ian Grimble, ‘Islands’ is a rich, expressive document. Lyrically, huge care and attention has been paid to each word, with Bear’s Den seemingly able to construct an entire living, breathing universe with just a rhyming couplet.

Lead singer – and songwriter – Davie explains that he views each track as being like a mini-novel in its own right. “I’ve always been interested in the way Raymond Carver and Ernest Hemingway leave room for interpretation,” he says. “It allows the listener to have their own individual relationship with the songs.”

‘Islands’ is an imposing introduction. With that in mind, Clash is able to premiere snippets of fresh material, much of it unheard.

Alongside this, Davie has pieced together a track by track guide to the forthcoming album.


Formed in the wake of the L.A. punk scene, the Red Hot Chili Peppers combined funk and punk with macho, sexed-up lyrics. (One early track was called “Party on Your Pussy”). The result was a high-octane sound that made the quintet alt-rock favorites in the Eighties, then superstars in the Nineties. But as the Chili Peppers aged, their songs became more laid-back and lyrical, and the band went from flesh-baring firecrackers (a 1992 Rolling Stone cover featured them naked) to respected veterans.
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While most bands reserve a self-titled album for their debut, the Dirty Heads, held off for an album deserving of the moniker. The band found one, in their fifth studio release, a total culmination of their signature sound. Drawing on the alternative rock, hip-hop, folk and reggae sounds from albums past to create something elevated and exciting. The band worked with top multi-genre producers such as Da Internz (Rihanna, Nicki Minaj), Drew Pearson (Katy PerryZac Brown Band) David Kahne (Lana Del Rey, The Strokes), and Jimmy Harry (Madonna, Diplo). The diversity of the production on this project is a true testament to the Dirty Heads versatility.  “With this album you can expect the pure Dirty Heads sound at its finest–a perfect blend of hip-hop and reggae,” says vocalist Jared Watson. “We have songs that range from summer anthems, songs you can vibe out to, and songs that really challenge you to think further. It’s everything the Dirty Heads stand for and what we’ve become up until now.”

The band purposely created an album to serve as the perfect playlist for both Day and Night. The first half of the record offers fans the perfect summertime fun playlist, while the second half offers a mellower vibe, reminiscent of a relaxed summer night with friends.

“In a world where music listeners no longer listen to albums cover to cover but rather discover their favorite songs from playlists on platforms like Apple Music or Spotify, we chose to curate a playlist for our fans with our new music” says Watson.


The Expanders began playing reggae music together in the summer of 2003, and today are one of the hardest working reggae bands in Southern California. They have come to be known for their vintage “rockers” style of reggae, played in the tradition of classic 1970′s Jamaican groups.  Their music is centered in three-part vocal harmonies and strong song writing, with lyrics that range from socially heavy, to playful and upbeat, to personal.

Speysyde